BOLD MATTERS: Revlon has donated more than $150,000 to Drought Angels to help Australian farmers across the country who are struggling to make ends meet.
(From left) Tash Johnston, Amy Kingon Smith and Jenny Gailey.
BOLD MATTERS: Revlon has donated more than $150,000 to Drought Angels to help Australian farmers across the country who are struggling to make ends meet. (From left) Tash Johnston, Amy Kingon Smith and Jenny Gailey. Kate McCormack

Dash of lippy makes all the difference

REVLON has raised more than $150,000 for Australian farmers struggling to make ends meet, and it's all thanks to one nifty little piece of make-up.

Two dollars from every Revlon Super Lustrous Lipstick sold from October 12 to November 11 was donated to Drought Angels, a locally run organisation helping farmers from all over Australia.

Revlon has donated over $150000 to Drought Angels to help Australian farmers across the country who are struggling to make ends meet.
BE BOLD: Revlon has donated more than $150,000 to Drought Angels through the sale of its number-one selling item - lipstick. Kate McCormack

Revlon's marketing manager, Amy Kingon Smith travelled all the way from Sydney yesterday to deliver the cheque in person.

"We want to use lipstick for good, that's the whole premise behind the Bold Matters campaign,” Mrs Kingon Smith said.

Revlon's campaign seeks to celebrate and embrace bold women who make the ordinary extraordinary and help cast light on matters that matter.

Mrs Kingon Smith said rural Australian communities like Chinchilla were full to the brim with bold women who possess incredible strength and resilience through times such as drought.

"It made perfect sense for Revlon to partner with Drought Angels for this campaign. We couldn't think of two bolder women than Tash and Jen.”

Natasha Johnston and Nicki Blackwell began Drought Angels in 2014 after hearing stories of struggling farmers who were unable to put food on their own tables.

The pair did some fundraising, loaded up a ute and a trailer with supplies and hit the road in the hope of providing assistance to one struggling family.

Four years later, Drought Angels has managed to assist countless farmers in some of the most remote places in the country.

In the past six months alone, 2400 farmers have registered with Drought Angels for assistance.

Revlon has donated over $150000 to Drought Angels to help Australian farmers across the country who are struggling to make ends meet.
BOLD WOMEN: Revlon marketing manager Amy Kingon Smith with Drought Angels' Tash Johnston and Jenny Gailey at the big cheque reveal. Kate McCormack

The month-long lipstick campaign managed to sell 76,372 lipsticks nationwide, bringing in an impressive $152,754.

"This money will allow us to support at least another 30 farming families, who are in desperate need of assistance,” Mrs Johnston said.

Drought Angels carris out most of its financial assistance through prepaid Visa cards, which allow farmers to discretely choose how they spend their support money.

Jenny Gailey said Drought Angels heard the words "this is life-changing,” on a regular basis.

"We are always thinking 'how can we assist more people?' We're always trying to come up with a new way to raise money so we can be there for the next farmer in need,” Mrs Gailey said.

"This contribution from Revlon means so much to us. It's a much bigger cheque than we were expecting. I'm just blown away,” Mrs Johnston said.

Revlon has donated over $150000 to Drought Angels to help Australian farmers across the country who are struggling to make ends meet.
BOLD REVEAL: Revlon's marketing manager Amy Kingon Smith makes the big reveal with Tash Johnston and Jenny Gailey. Kate McCormack

Mrs Kingon Smith said Australia really got behind this campaign, with Revlon seeing sales increasing as much as 30 per cent in some retail outlets.

"Corporate Australia has a responsibility to support our farmers because, at the end of the day, without them we will all go hungry,” she said.

"This campaign just goes to show with some work and the right attitude, something small like a tube of lipstick can make a big difference.”

With recent analysis from the University of Melbourne revealing the current drought crisis is likely to be the worst in 400 years, every little bit of help is imperative.