Have-a-go heroes take down terrorist and save a city

 

They are the makeshift anti-terror squad who have been called the Have-a-go Heroes.

A group of at least seven mostly ordinary people who, without a second thought, risked their lives to stop knife-wielding London terrorist Usman Khan.

Terrorist Usman Khan is tackled by Londoners armed with a whale tusk and fire extinguisher. Picture: Ketts News
Terrorist Usman Khan is tackled by Londoners armed with a whale tusk and fire extinguisher. Picture: Ketts News

 

One of the heroes confronts terrorist Usman Khan with a narwhal tusk. Picture: Ketts News.
One of the heroes confronts terrorist Usman Khan with a narwhal tusk. Picture: Ketts News.

 

Police join the fray after hero bystanders took down the terrorist, armed with a narwhal tusk and a fire extinguisher.
Police join the fray after hero bystanders took down the terrorist, armed with a narwhal tusk and a fire extinguisher.

Their weapons ranged from a 1.5m narwhal tusk to a silver fire extinguisher.

Their ranks included two tour guides, a chef from the nearby historic Fishmongers' Hall and a convicted murderer on day release.

They had had a common motivation: standing up for a city that is still recovering from the scars of the 2017 London terror attacks.

They sprang into action about 2pm local time after Khan attempted to inflict more carnage on London Bridge after killing two people and injuring three others with two 20cm knives strapped to his hands.

The group chased Khan onto the bridge, with video showing them surrounding him at one point, before the terrorist was eventually shot dead by police.

Hero: Thomas Gray. Picture: ITV Facebook
Hero: Thomas Gray. Picture: ITV Facebook

 

Hero: Stevie Hurst. Picture: Facebook
Hero: Stevie Hurst. Picture: Facebook

 

Hero: James Ford, a murderer on day release. Picture: PA
Hero: James Ford, a murderer on day release. Picture: PA

An unnamed chef reportedly left his post at the Fishmongers' Hall and ripped the narwhal tusk off the wall before joining the fray.

Convicted murderer James Ford, who was reportedly attending the same prisoner rehabilitation conference as the attacker, rushed to the scene and tried to save the life of a female victim of the terrorist.

Ford, 42, was jailed for life - with a minimum of 15 years - in 2004 for the brutal murder of a 21-year-old girl with learning difficulties.

Another man, whose identity has been withheld, was a plainclothes Transport Police officer who sprinted across the bridge to join the fray. He seized one of Khan's knives and then began shepherding bystanders away.

Tour guides Thomas Gray and Stevie Hurst were among the first to jump out of their cars to offer help, risking their lives to pin the attacker down.

Mr Gray told how he tried to "stamp as hard as I could" on the attacker's wrist to release the knife duct-taped to his hand.

Mr Hurst told how he kicked the killer in the head to keep him on the ground.

"Everyone was just on top of him trying to bundle him to the ground," Mr Hurst said.

"We saw that the knife was still in his hand … I just put a foot in to try and kick him in the head. "We were trying to do as much as we could to try and dislodge the knife from his hand so he wouldn't harm anyone else.

"The guy was just screaming 'get off me, get off me!'. But we wanted to make sure he would never do this again, that he was never going to harm another human being on the planet.

"The guys that were there were absolutely amazing. Heroes beyond belief."

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